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  • Your Initial Visit
  • Your Injection Visit
  • Your Laser Visit

On your initial visit, please allow approximately 3 hours of your time. We need time to get to know you and your eyes.

Please bring with you to your appointment:

  • Completed new patient forms (Click Here To Download Forms)
  • Your insurance cards
  • Any referral forms from your referring or primary care physician
  • A list of all your medications and eyedrops that you are using

On that day, your eyes will be dilated (eye drops will be placed to open your pupils). This dilation may last up to 4-6 hours; therefore, we recommend that you are accompanied by a driver. Your retina specialist will meet you, listen to your symptoms and perform a comprehensive eye exam. Your diagnosis will then be discussed and your questions answered. Your retina specialist may then order additional tests to help better diagnose and treat your retinal problem. These tests include:

Digital Fundus Photography – A special camera will be used to obtain photographs of your retina. This is a non-invasive test. These photographs are often obtained to document findings in your retina and used for future comparison.

Fluorescein Angiography (FA) – This test involves the use of fluorescein dye, a vegetable-based dye that is injected through a peripheral vein in your arm or hand. After injection of the dye, a special camera is use to capture a series of images of the dye as it circulates through your retina. These images are helpful in diagnosing specific retinal diseases, to assist in determining specific treatments, and to monitor disease progression and treatment response. Please note, this dye is not the same dye used in CT scans.

Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) – This is a fast, non-invasive technique where camera captures special light rays used to create a cross-sectional image of your retina. These images can reveal areas of abnormalities in your retina. The images can be used to monitor disease progression and treatment response.

Fundus Autofluorescence (FAF) – This is a new, non-invasive imaging technique that uses a special camera to captures a response from specific molecules underneath the retina to show areas of affected or damaged retina. These images can be used to monitor disease progression over time.

B-Scan Ultrasonography – This technique uses an ultrasound machine, similar to the machine used for expectant mothers to image the developing baby, to visualize the back of your eye. The images obtained of your retina and vitreous can provide your doctor with important information for diagnosis and treatment planning.

Your retina specialist will then come up with a plan of treatment. He will then discuss the treatment options with you and your family. The examination and these ancillary tests do take up time. We do appreciate your patience.

If your retina specialist recommends that you receive an injection of medicine in your eye, please allow about an hour of your time with us on that visit. It may be helpful to have someone with you that day.

We at PRS understand that your injection visit can be extremely stressful. Our staff strives to make this difficult time as comfortable as possible. On the day of your injection, you will have your vision checked and your eyes dilated. A scan of your retina may be performed while your eyes dilate. The eye to be injected will then be carefully anesthetized with eye drops and gels. The surface of your eye and the eyelids will be thoroughly cleansed using a Povidone Iodine solution. Once your eye is numbed, the surface of the eye and the eyelids will be thoroughly cleansed using a Povidone Iodine solution. Your retina specialist will then look at your eye, identify the eye to be injected and perform the injection. The actual injection will only take a few moments. Your eye will then be thoroughly rinsed.

When you get home, your eye that was injected may become irritated. This is usually due to the cleansing solution that was used. Your retina specialist may recommend that you use artificial tears, compresses and over-the-counter analgesics (such as Tylenol or Advil). Any significant pain that is not relieved by the aforementioned treatments, or any loss of vision should prompt you to give our office a call.

If your retina specialist recommends that you receive laser treatment, please allow about an hour of your time with us on that visit. It may be helpful to have someone with you that day.

We at PRS understand that your laser visit may be stressful. Our staff strives to make this difficult time as comfortable as possible. On the day of your laser procedure, you will have your vision checked and your eye dilated. That eye will then be carefully anesthetized with medications. Your retina specialist will then look at your eye, identify the eye to be treated and then perform the laser procedure. The procedure can last between 5 minutes to 20 minutes, depending on the type of laser recommended. Your eye may be patched upon completion of the procedure.

When you get home, your eye that was treated may become slightly irritated and sore, or you may develop a mild headache. Your doctor may advise you to take over-the-counter analgesics (such as Tylenol or Advil). Using artificial tears or compresses may also help. Any significant pain that is not relieved by the aforementioned treatments, or any loss of vision should prompt you to give our office a call.